Manuscript Guidelines and Format Specification

Manuscript Guidelines

Articles should:

  • Describe exemplary state-of-the-art tested classroom activities or resources for K-12 Earth and Space Science educators, or updates on background science topics that are relevant to the K-12 Earth and Space Science curriculum.
  • Describe proven innovations in pedagogical approaches and classroom tools for the Earth and Space Science classroom.
  • Include original material only; references must be properly cited according to APA style manual
  • Use clean and concise writing style, spell and grammar checked
  • Demonstrate clear classroom relevance

Format Specifications

  • Use Microsoft Word (PC or Mac), Appleworks, size 10 font, single-spaced.
  • Submit manuscripts electronically.
  • Include a summary/abstract with submission.
  • Limit length of manuscript to 2000 words.
  • Include author names, school/organizations, mailing address, home and work phone numbers, and e-mail addresses.
  • Number all figures and include captions (Figure 1. XYZ).
  • Follow guidelines for photos and graphs: all photos and graphs should be of excellent quality and in jpeg format. (300 dpi minimum, high resolution)
  • Provide a signed model release for EACH recognizable individual pictured in any photo.

Manuscripts will be reviewed for relevance and accuracy. The editor will reply to the author to inform him/her if the article has been accepted as is, accepted with revisions, or declined. When the article is accepted, the editor will send the author the Copyright Transfer form. Once the signed Copyright Transfer form has been received, article revisions completed, and journal layout finalized, the author will be billed for page charges. Articles which are declined may be revised and resubmitted for future publication, if the author desires.


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Current Issue

We are very excited about this special, peer reviewed, Fall 2014 issue of The Earth Scientist (TES). This issue contains 6 articles, ranging from the benefits of studying earth science in Hawaii, to how to participate in the 2014 Earth Science Week, from learning about how to be a part of the National Ocean Science Bowl, to learning about an exciting new approach to Climate Change Education, and from an analysis how to enhance student understanding by questioning protocol, to an article exploring the efficacy and engagement of a Glacial Melt Simulation.

We are sure that you will find within these highly informative articles, something that will enhance your knowledge as well as something that will translate into immediate use in your own classroom.